We have Relocated

Our New Address is: 1901 N. Solar Drive, Suite 135, Oxnard, CA. 93036

Welcome to the comprehensive medical library of Dr. Curtis Sandahl. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.


Understanding Wisdom TeethLas muelas del juicio: descripci³n

Understanding Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth are very much like your other permanent teeth. The main difference is that they are the last to develop and grow in (when you're "older and wiser"). Most people have four wisdom teeth, one in each corner of the mouth. Some people naturally lack one or more of their wisdom teeth.

     

Wisdom Teeth and Your Dental Anatomy

There are several types of teeth. Each type is designed either for biting or for chewing. The wisdom teeth are molars, or chewing teeth. Both the upper and lower jaws have three molars on each side. The wisdom teeth are the last in line, which is why they're called "third molars." Because there are eight other molars to do the chewing, most people can get along fine without wisdom teeth.

Anatomy of a Tooth

The crown is the part of the tooth that has a hard chewing surface. Below the gumline, the root anchors the tooth to the bone. Nerves and blood vessels enter and exit the tooth through the roots.

How Wisdom Teeth Develop

All teeth form within the jawbones. As the roots grow, the tooth's crown gradually pushes toward the gum until it erupts (breaks through the gum). After a tooth has erupted, the roots continue to lengthen. It takes years for the roots to develop completely. The jawbones become denser and more rigid over time.

  • Around age 9, wisdom teeth start to form inside the jawbones. The jawbones have a lot more growing to do, so they are not yet at their full density.

  • By the late teens, wisdom teeth roots have developed and are lengthening. The crown of each wisdom tooth may begin to erupt.

  • By the early 20s, each wisdom tooth has erupted or is impacted (unable to fully erupt). The roots may still be forming. The jawbones have finished growing.

  • By about age 40, the roots of the wisdom teeth are solidly anchored in the bone. The jawbones have reached their adult density.

Date Last Reviewed:

Date Last Modified:


If you have any questions or concerns regarding any condition or treatment, please contact Dr. Curtis Sandahl. To schedule an appointment please call (805) 485-5331 or use our online Request an Appointment form.

Patient Reviews

I actually enjoy going to the dentist
I actually enjoy going to the dentist! I have never had a bad experience at Dr Sandahls office, and I trust him completely with my oral care. He actually stayed late to accommodate my schedule today. I would highly recommend him to anyone I know, and anyone I don't know. You won't be disappointed with the service you will receive.
- JAY M.

Copyright © 2022 Practice Builders Healthcare Marketing Agency and Dr. Curtis Sandahl. All rights reserved.